Industrial Law and the Productive Capacity of Labour in Nigeria

Matthew Enya Nwocha

Abstract


This Paper has discussed the various employment laws in the country and the inherent defects in them that have impacted negatively on staff productivity. The Paper came against the background of the low productive output of the Nigerian worker that has adversely affected the growth of the national economy and created room for fraud and corruption in the public service as well as the private sector. The Paper has found that aside of defective labour laws, the mentality of Nigerian courts to labour disputes, the negative attitude of Nigerian workers and poor work ethics, and the poor conditions of service in the labour sector all contribute to low output and productivity. Therefore, the Paper has suggested ways that these negative trends can be reversed among them, the amendment of the extant industrial laws and improvement of the working conditions of the Nigerian employee. 


Keywords


National economy; development; employee; labour law; productivity; industrial relationship; labour disputes; adjudication

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References


Abbott, K., Pendlebury, N., Wardman, K. (2013). Business Law, 9th ed. UK: CENGAGE Learning.

Bose, D.C. (2008). Business Law. New Delhi: PHI Learning Private Limited.

Constitution of the Federal Republic of Nigeria, 1999.

Employees’ Compensation Act, 2010.

Factories Act, 1987.

Labour Act, 1971.

MacIntyre E. (2008). Business Law. Harlow: Pearson Education Limited.

National Industrial Court Act, 2006.

Nwocha M.E. (2010). «An Appraisal of Economic Liberalization and Sustainable Development in Nigeria» in: Abuja Journal of Public and International Law, Vol. 1, No. 1.

Olakanmi, J. (2012). Labour Law Handbook, 3rd ed. Abuja: Lawlords Publications.

Pension Reform Act, 2004.

Trade Disputes Act, 2006.

Trade Unions Act, 1973.

Uvieghara, E.E. (2001). Labour Law in Nigeria. Lagos: Malthouse Press Ltd.


GOST Style Citations


  1. Abbott, K., Pendlebury, N., Wardman, K. (2013). Business Law, 9th ed. UK: CENGAGE Learning.
  2. Bose, D.C. (2008). Business Law. New Delhi: PHI Learning Private Limited.
  3. Constitution of the Federal Republic of Nigeria, 1999.
  4. Employees’ Compensation Act, 2010.
  5. Factories Act, 1987.
  6. Labour Act, 1971.
  7. MacIntyre E. (2008). Business Law. Harlow: Pearson Education Limited.
  8. National Industrial Court Act, 2006.
  9. Nwocha M.E. (2010). «An Appraisal of Economic Liberalization and Sustainable Development in Nigeria» in: Abuja Journal of Public and International Law, Vol. 1, No. 1.  
  10. Olakanmi, J. (2012). Labour Law Handbook, 3rd ed. Abuja: Lawlords Publications.
  11. Pension Reform Act, 2004.
  12. Trade Disputes Act, 2006.
  13. Trade Unions Act, 1973.
  14. Uvieghara, E.E. (2001). Labour Law in Nigeria. Lagos: Malthouse Press Ltd.




DOI: https://doi.org/10.21564/2414-990x.137.99935

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